Renewable Energy

About Our Renewable Energy Work: Energy use—including electricity, transportation, and heating—is the most significant source of the pollution that is changing our climate and causing smog, acid rain, toxic mercury pollution, and other serious environmental problems. Environmental Advocates of New York’s Air & Energy Program is focused on reducing air pollution and promoting the clean technologies that will set New York on the path to a safe and sustainable energy future.

Our work includes promoting policies that will improve air quality and reduce global warming pollution, as well as supporting New York’s efforts to increase energy efficiency and conservation and accelerate clean energy development.

Friday, May 10, 2013

There, we said it. The Tesla Model S outscores every other car in our test Ratings. It does so even though it's an electric car. In fact, it does so because it is electric.

Friday, May 10, 2013

SheerWind, a wind power company from Minnesota, USA, has announced the results of tests it has carried out with its new Invelox wind power generation technology. The company says that during tests its turbine could generate six times more energy than the amount produced by traditional turbines mounted on towers. Besides, the costs of producing wind energy with Invelox are lower, delivering electricity with prices that can compete with natural gas and hydropower.

Friday, May 10, 2013

A common refrain, from skeptics to allies alike, is that renewable energy is a great idea, but not feasible because oil, gas, and coal will always be cheaper. Leaving aside the fact that fossil fuels are a finite resource and are the primary driver behind a warming planet, is it really true that renewable energy is more expensive?

Thursday, May 9, 2013

In a U.S. patent application, a little-known Maryland inventor claims a stunning solar energy breakthrough that promises to end the planet’s reliance on fossil fuels at a fraction of the current cost – a transformation that also could blunt global warming.

Inventor Ronald Ace said that his flat-panel “Solar Traps,” which can be mounted on rooftops or used in electric power plants, will shatter decades-old scientific and technological barriers that have stymied efforts to make solar energy a cheap, clean and reliable alternative.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

The world’s nations must scrap fossil fuel subsidies and put a price on emitting carbon dioxide, the president of the World Bank has warned.

Speaking at a meeting of energy and environment ministers in Germany, Jim Yong Kim, said that countries must phase out “regressive” subsidies that negatively impact the environment and prevent progress in clean technology if they want to avoid dangerous climate change.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Swedish researchers have developed the world's first water-activated charger that can power your cellphone using just a puddle of ordinary water.

Based on micro fuel cell technology developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the MyFC PowerTrekk uses ordinary water to extend battery life for devices of up to 3 watts.

Anders Lundblad, KTH researcher and founder of MyFC, says that the device can be powered by fresh or seawater. The water need not be completely clean.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Our opinion: Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says federal review of the Keystone XL pipeline is woefully incomplete. How can anyone ignore the legal mandate to consider environmental damage?

Really, now, how could the Obama administration seem to favor allowing a pipeline carrying oil from the tar sands of western Canada all the way to Texas without assessing how that would contribute to climate change?

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Telecom giant Verizon is expected to announce on Tuesday that it plans to spend $100 million on clean power projects, including installing solar panels and fuel cells at 19 locations to help power its buildings and network infrastructure. Verizon�s Chief Sustainability Officer James Gowen plans to make the announcement at Fortune�s Brainstorm Green conference on Tuesday.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Google surprised a lot of people in 2010 when it received approval from federal regulators to buy and sell electricity at market rates just like a utility. Was Google actually getting into the business of selling you power?

Well, not exactly. The company wasn't really looking to replace utilities. The move was designed to help Google procure more renewable energy for itself by giving it the flexibility to invest directly in large projects and sell the power back to the grid if needed.

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