Climate Change

About Our Climate Change Work: New York is a leader in implementing policies to reduce global warming pollution. Environmental Advocates of New York has worked with leaders on both sides of the aisle to implement policies that reduce climate pollution and adapt to our already changing climate. Our work with former Governor Pataki lead to his proposal to other Northeastern states to undergo a regional effort to reduce climate pollution from power plants, which eventually became the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. In addition, thanks in parts to our efforts, former Governor Paterson implemented a state goal to reduce climate pollution by 80% by the year 2050 and develop a climate action plan.

But in order to avert the worst effects of climate change, the state must do more. Environmental Advocates promotes policies that reduce the state’s share of climate pollution to meet this goal.

Albany County Executive Dan McCoy has appointed our Peter Iwanowicz to chair an expert panel which will advise and coordinate the hiring of independent consultants

One of our major campaigns in 2013 was to get the NY-Sun Initiative, which helps get climate-friendly solar developments up and running, secured for another 10 years. Thousands of our members contacted Governor Cuomo, and he’s made it happen! You deserve a big hand for helping us notch this important victory for cleaner, healthier energy – thank you!

Environmental Advocates of New York has been at the center of every environmental debate within state government for over 40 years.

And we love offering the opportunity for college students to intern with us, gain practical experience, as well as to help build your resume in advance of your future career search.

For the spring semester, Environmental Advocates is offering three internships; while internship are unpaid (hey, that’s nonprofit life for you!), we are pleased to offer academic credit with your college or university.

As the federal government looks for ideas to implement a national program that both decreases climate pollution and increases investments in clean energy solutions, it should look no further than the Northeast and our very own Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI).

It never crossed my mind that New York’s elected officials would let the 2013 legislative session end without taking some kind of meaningful action to fight climate change. I mean, the devastation felt by recent storms, floods, and extreme weather patterns is too much to ignore, right?

You’ve heard us talk often about the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI); it’s an innovative program of nine Northeast states which cuts carbon pollution while making polluters pay for new sources of clean energy. RGGI is responsible for thousands of solar installations, 

The window of opportunity

New York’s legislators – the people you pay to represent your interests – are preparing to leave Albany for the rest of the year in just two weeks. And there are still a lot of environmental issues on the agenda that we need your help getting over the finish line. Environmental Advocates and our partners have helped secure enough support for the passage of three priority bills which would:

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is finally moving ahead with long overdue regulatory actions to limit climate altering carbon pollution from the nation’s power sector. The agency has issued draft regulations to cap carbon emission from new coal and natural gas power plants and is in the process of developing standards for existing power plants.

 

This is your brain on toxics 

 

Picture an egg and a mousetrap. Now see that cool visual in action for yourself. While the image is dramatic it drives home why we work so hard to get toxic chemicals out 

How did the issue of climate change become so polarizing? Documented scientific evidence of decades of rising temperatures – with 12 of the hottest years on record occurring in the last 15 years, stronger and more intense storms, severe flooding and prolonged drought seem to be having little to no impact on American public opinion.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Climate Change